edit letter spreadsheet

How to Process an Edit Letter (with spreadsheets)

At some point in your writing career you're going to be given an edit letter. Edit letters are what a publisher, editor, agent, or even a critique partner or beta reader, give you in addition to any notes they've made on the manuscript itself. It's the prose where this person lays out the things they think are or aren't working in your manuscript. Edit letters can be very intimidating. The higher up the publishing food chain you go, the more you're likely to get a long edit letter. Your beta reader pal may give you a page, because they rather liked it or aren't super sure how to articulate their thoughts. A publishing pro has money riding on your book so they may give you several pages. Like, a dozen. Single-spaced. Starting to sweat yet? Take a towel and a knee. Edit letters don't have to be scary. In fact, after my initial 'oh dear god' reaction, my next instinct is, 'YES.' Because an edit letter means the person writing it has read your work, digested it, and then crafted their thoughts for you. Edit letters distill and prioritize. They're immensely helpful. If you know how to handle them. Here's how I've been handling my revision process, particularly when it comes to interpreting edit letters. As promised, there will be spreadsheets, because I like my information dynamic and sortable. ...